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Gene Disease (Cancer) Association
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6.3 years ago
TitoPullo • 150
United Kingdom

I'm a computer scientist, so I don't have a lot of knowledge about biology. I developed a statistical method to highlight some genes from microarray dataset. Now, I'd like to know if the gene I selected are related to the microarray problem. That is, given a microarray dataset about Prostate Cancer (or Leukemia), I'd like to know if genes: X,Y,Z, etc. are already known to be related, in literature, with Prostate cancer. Is there any tool/website that could help me? Is there a way that, given a gene, I know all the disease associated to it? Or, in the other way around, what's the better method to get all the genes associated with a particular disease?

UPDATE:

I'd suggest an interesting tool that I've found: Diseases. It mines the literature to associate genes to diseases or viceversa.

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Take a look at this answer to a similar question.

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19 months ago
Arnaud Ceol • 840
Milan, Italy

That's exactly what you will find if you download data from the The cancer Gene Census at http://cancer.sanger.ac.uk/cancergenome/projects/census/

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But this website list all the studies involving that particular gene. It doesn't tell me if that gene is actually related with the disease.

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"The cancer Gene Census is an ongoing effort to catalogue those genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer.": you can download the Excel or tab delimited file, it lists all genes and associated cancer types.

e.g.: Symbol Name GeneID Chr Chr Band Cancer Somatic Mut Cancer Germline Mut Tumour Types (Somatic Mutations) ABI1 abl-interactor 1 10006 10 10p11.2 yes AML

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4.0 years ago
Copenhagen, Denmark

There's some good sources already in a comment, but I'd like to highlight a few more:

  • PubMed: Just search for the gene, really, and look at studies. If you're into the more advanced stuff, look at co-mentions (i.e. in how many articles are the gene and the word prostate cancer, or any derivative thereof, co-mentioned)
  • ExpressionAtlas: Look at other peoples results, and compare.

I would just like to point out an obvious problem with what you are asking: "to be related to disease X" can have multiple meanings. Related how? A mutation is causing the cancer, it's a prognostic marker of the cancer, overexpression drives the cancer and so on.

Also, be aware that there are a lot of different statistical methods for microarray analysis. If you ever submit a paper using this method, be aware that a lot of reviewers will be very critical about methods they're not familiar with (this is my own opinion, and I only have my own experiences to back it up, and is not meant to be discouraging.)

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I think PubMed is the best resource for me.

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20 months ago
Vivek ♦ 2.3k
Denmark

Along with the ones already mentioned you could search the OMIM genemap for genes with phenotypes associated with a specific disease.

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